Ask us! VIDEOS

There's a process to building motivation in your children. Start with an interest, be intentional about the interests, and as your child pursues it, it quickly turns into a marketable and useful talent. Start young so that by the time your child turns 16 years old, doors open and opportunities begin!  Start with the basics:  choose a viable interest.

How do I figure out which interest my child should pursue (that won't break the family!)?

Make sure you allow your child to pursue an interest that makes sense for both your child AND your family! Listen to Jonathan and Renee discuss the cautions you should take as a parent to make sure you're going down the right road toward developing an interest to turn it into a talent.

How do I fit my child's interest development into our family's busy schedule?

Your family's schedule is already packed - how do you fit in your child's interests into your already busy schedule? Jonathan suggests doing "double duty" with your family's activities. This will come naturally once you figure out your family culture. Listen to other suggestions and see what you can do with your family!

Why is Talent Development Important?

Why should you stick with an interest long enough for your child to start to develop a full-blown talent? Jonathan and Renee discuss the need to start with an interest, get past the frustration of having the initial novelty of the interest wear off (to the point where they might get bored with it), and then watch their motivation and passion come to life when they find that what they're doing is exciting and brings value to other people. Don't give up too soon! True talent is a process.

Your child's talent will open doors to new opportunities! Here's how.

Jonathan and Renee discuss the many ways that developing your child's interests into talent will open doors for them in the future. Your job as the parent is to encourage your child to spend time getting good at their interest (more on how to identify the interest in our other videos).

My child wants to pursue an interest I don't think they're good at...

Jonathan's answer? "It depends."

First, you're definitely allowed to call the shot on the talent and if you're opposed to the particular talent, then you can certainly say no. Beyond that, if you think they're not cut out for it, start with gradually allowing the interest to develop and then be prepared to pivot slightly toward your child's natural strengths. Those skills may compensate for the weaknesses. This is also a good time to see what the initial motivation was for that interest, and to see if she has the "stick with it ness"... some great conversations may ensue.

My daughter is no longer interested in the talent she started...

She begged to join gymnastics. Initially, she loved it! After several months, she wants nothing to do with it. How long do you stick with something before moving on to a new interest? Depending on her age, you may need to dig into the reason(s) why. See if you can get her to stick with it by changing up the tools, providing a new environment, see if she needs to be challenged, or potentially scale back. The good news: if you can guide her through this, she'll have the skills and habits to make decisions when she faces something similar as an adult.

My son wants to develop his talent all day long...

Another great problem to have! He's so obsessed with interest that he can't sleep at night. We have tips for helping the parents "turn off" the stimulation for a bit so that other school subjects and responsibilities can get accomplished. At the same time, this is fantastic for talent development and it's time to look for areas for your child to merge some of his responsibilities with his talent. Allow his talent to spill over into other areas of his life. This is pushing him toward great performance!

download this file that shows you whether their hobby can be turned into a valuable talent

Can your child's hobby be turned into a useful talent?

Download this checklist to find out!